Aftercare

Coombs Aftercare is centred around the company ethos of building and maintaining strong long-lasting relationships.

Coombs take a proactive approach in its Aftercare service. Having a local and independent team on hand provides a much needed clarity on each project to meet each client’s expectations.

Coombs Aftercare is centred around the company ethos of building and maintaining strong long-lasting relationships. Our involvement doesn’t end when we complete your refurbishment project or hand over the keys to your pristine building. Our Aftercare Team are available to provide advice on how to get the most out of your property investment and the technologies within.

“It is a widely held view that older buildings are not energy-efficient, and must be radically upgraded in order to improve their performance. In reality, the situation is more complicated, and assumptions about poor performance are not always justified. Even so, the energy and carbon performance of most historic buildings can be improved, which will help them remain viable and useful, now and in the future. But striking the right balance between benefit and harm is not easy. The unintended consequences of getting energy efficiency measures wrong (or doing them badly) include: harm to heritage values and significance, harm to human health and building fabric, and failure to achieve the predicted savings or reductions in environmental impact.

Getting the balance right (and avoiding unintended consequences) is best done with a holistic approach that uses an understanding of a building, its context, its significance, and all the factors affecting energy use as the starting point for devising an energy-efficiency strategy. This ‘whole building approach’ ensures that energy-efficiency measures are suitable, robust, well integrated, properly coordinated and sustainable.”

Energy Efficiency and Historic Buildings: How to Improve Energy Efficiency. Publication by Historic England

"It is a mistake to assume that familiar materials will continue to behave in exactly the same ways in a changing climate. Designers will need to have a thorough understanding of the fundamental principles of materials' behaviour and building physics so as to predict behaviour under different climate conditions."

Design for Future Climate, report by architect Bill Gething